Holi during Coronavirus

How to celebrate Holi during Coronavirus

How to celebrate Holi during Coronavirus

How to celebrate Holi Through Coronavirus

A person who may have symptoms of flu should avoid Holi gatherings in any instance because being drenched or exposure to dry colours can exacerbate symptoms. For all others, the festival might as well be just like any other day, albeit the extra hour which one needs to put in to clean themselves after the celebrations thoroughly. In times of coronavirus, the best way to play Holi is by heading to swadeshi. Like many other products in India, even Holi colors are made in China, from where this virus originated. At most, this season, perhaps one needs to think about limiting their Holi amassing guest records to include just those people they trust and know. Many Indians who adore the festival, but struggle with respiratory disorders, choose to wear masks to protect themselves from inhaling dry colour particles.

Bestway to celebrate Holi with your Household at Home

Why do we need the fear of COVID-19 to be careful on Holi? Isn’t this ghastly holiday dangerous enough to avoid it at all times? So, the best approach to’enjoy’ Holi is to be at home, eat your favourite dishes, spend some time with your loved ones and not step out under any circumstances. For those who want to be extra careful, such masks might not be a bad idea for Holi this year. Washing your hands at regular intervals and not eating from the very same plates would be sensible.

Prevent Cheap Colours

We are from India, despite the China-made colors having being sold in the markets here way before coronavirus broke out, we have been playing Holi with mud, gobar (cow/buffalo dung) and dust. Small pits are dug and full of water, after which individuals are thrown to them. Anything in hand from gobar to dust can be used. That way, we save a lot of water as well. Holi 2021 is not a festival that spreads joy for everybody. Society’s permit to goons and creeps to do anything that they want with girls, men, creatures — anyone they can get hold of on the roads. And those thugs have a strong line in their side that society has given its approval to while shooting away the approval of those at the receiving end of this line: Bura na mano Holi Hai. Get lost already. It’s a shame that the perceived feeling of’offending’ Hindus for their religio-cultural abomination has compelled Indian society to put a cover over the threat that comes every year.

Holi through Coronavirus As per a report, 90 percent of Indians use Chinese colors to celebrate Holi. And there are different reports on how the situation in China can spoil the soul of the Indian festival this time around. So, visiting swadeshi is your best way to savor Holi. While I use the term’swadeshi’, ” I don’t mean it in a way the right-wingers or anti-China campaigners would imply. The most frequent refrain in households is not to step from the house. Please don’t go out because it is not safe. A day of celebration is a security threat with people’s greetings to every other almost always followed by a request to be secure. Overall, as long as you’re in the organization of trustworthy friends and family, who keep basic personal hygiene and do not have flu-like symptoms, there’s absolutely no reason to boycott the festival of colors altogether.

Before heading out, drink plenty of water. There is a huge chance of getting dehydrated.

Try to make sure nobody at the group coming together to perform Holi shows indications of a cough, fever or cold.
Playing cold water will increase the chances of becoming infected with seasonal influenza, so proceed dry or use lukewarm water to play Holi.
Wash your hands when you have food. Holi colours are powders that may become easily be transmitted to food items. Maintain all the food things away from the playing area.

A way of conserving water is using Pichkari rather than buckets of colored water.
Keep a first-aid kit ready for emergencies.

Throughout Holi, assess local advisory in your area and follow them.

Why do we need the fear of COVID-19 to be cautious on Holi? Isn’t this ghastly festival dangerous enough to avoid it at all times?

Holi is not a festival that spreads joy for all. Society’s license to goons and creeps to do anything they want with women, men, animals – anyone they can get hold of on the streets. And these thugs have a robust line on their side that society has given its consent to while taking away the consent of those at the receiving end of the line: Bura na mano Holi Hai. Get lost already. It’s a shame that the perceived sense of ‘offending’ Hindus for their religio-cultural abomination has forced Indian society to put a cover over the danger that comes every year.

Bestway to celebrate Holi with your Family at Home

Holi isn’t a cause for celebration. The most common refrain in households is to not step out of the home. Please don’t go out because it isn’t safe. A day of celebration is a safety hazard with people’s greetings to each other almost always followed by a plea to be safe.

So, the best way to ‘enjoy’ Holi is to be at home, eat your favourite dishes, spend time with your family and not step out under any circumstances.

A person who might have symptoms of flu should avoid Holi gatherings in any case because being drenched or exposure to dry colours can exacerbate symptoms. For all others, the festival may as well be like any other day, albeit the extra hour that one needs to put in to clean themselves after the celebrations thoroughly.

General precautions

  • Before heading out, drink plenty of water. There is a massive chance of getting dehydrated.
  • Try to make sure no one in the group coming together to play Holi shows signs of a cough, fever or cold.
  • Playing with cold water will increase the chances of getting infected with seasonal flu, so go dry or use lukewarm water to play Holi.
  • Wash your hands when you have food. Holi colours are powders that can get easily be transmitted to food items. Keep all the food items away from the playing area.
  • A way of saving water is using Pichkari instead of buckets of coloured water.
  • Keep a first-aid kit ready for emergencies.
  • During Holi, check local advisory in your area and follow them. Greet people with an open heart but avoid shaking hands and hugging each others.

At most, this year, perhaps one should consider limiting their Holi gathering guest lists to include only those people they know and trust. Many Indians who love the festival, but struggle with respiratory disorders, choose to wear masks to protect themselves from inhaling dry colour particles.

Holi during COVID-19

Holi during Coronavirus

For those who want to be extra cautious, such masks may not be a bad idea for Holi this year. Washing your hands at regular intervals and not eating from the same plates would be prudent.

Overall, as long as you are in the company of trustworthy friends and family, who maintain basic personal hygiene and do not have flu-like symptoms, there is no reason to boycott the festival of colours altogether.

Avoid Cheap Colours

In times of coronavirus, the best way to play Holi is by going to swadeshi. Like many other products in India, even Holi colours are made in China, from where this virus originated.

As per a report, 90 per cent of Indians use Chinese colours to celebrate Holi. And there are other reports on how the situation in China can spoil the spirit of the Indian festival this time around. So, going to swadeshi is the best way to enjoy Holi. When I use the word ‘swadeshi’, I don’t mean it in a way the right-wingers or anti-China campaigners would mean.

We are from India, and despite the China-made colours having being sold in the markets here way before coronavirus broke out, we have been playing Holi with mud, gobar (cow/buffalo dung) and dust. Small pits are dug and filled with water, after which people are thrown into them. Anything in hand from gobar to dust is used. That way, we save a lot of water as well.